Harm on Trust The Doc

Thanks to Neil from Trust the Doc for reviewing my new single “Harm” off upcoming album Farewell, Doomed Planet! An excerpt:

…the ambient soundscape gradually grows in volume and intensity, almost but not quite engulfing the voices before it judders to a halt one second short of three minutes (so radio programmers, take note – perfect length for airplay). So another fine track by this versatile artist.

Full review up on the blog (also a review of my buddy Xqui!).

Harm on I Heart Noise

A huge thank you to I Heart Noise for premiering “Harm” off the upcoming album Farewell, Doomed Planet! They also gave it a really nice write-up on the blog:

[Harm’s] sole focus is Atmosphere with a capital A, one of utter coldness and desolation – the ethereal/melancholic vocals being a cherry on top of the proverbial cake. While it may not cause millions to change their mind about climate it certainly moves you in a way that any really well crafted song should.

Departure 2019 in Cassette Gods

Beautiful review of the Departure 2019 tape on Cassette Gods this weekend:

“Kelly brings her considerable chops as a singer, a songwriter, and a mischievous experimental imp to the table, delighting everybody in earshot with magnificent synthesizers and baroque arrangements, recalling Vangelis and Tangerine Dream and Enya and Björk, but also the sweeping buzz and interjected interruption of our greatest generation of outsider talent.”

Full review over on the site. Thank you, Ryan!

More What Penumbras/ShopLand World reviews

Our supermarkets may be small, but our musical ambition knows no bounds! The Strategic Tape Reserve compilation ShopLand World: Music for a Discovery Park of Miniature Supermarkets  has continued receiving favorable press, including some alarmingly non-sarcastic banter on the Tabs Out Cassette Podcast. “What Penumbras,” my contribution, also received some praise in Pat Padua’s Spectrum Culture 3.2 star review of the album:

“This isn’t a trip to the dazzling cornucopia of the modern grocery store, but a descent into a commercial hellscape, with a quick succession of shimmering blips suggesting a nightmarish aural vision of the checkout aisle.”

Padua also calls the album a “a dense and frequently unsettling anthology.” Read the full review on the site!

Want more? Here are a couple more reviews of the compilation:
Lost In A Sea of Sound
Cassette Gods