You Can Never Leave in The Wire

Such a great review of You Can Never Leave by Antonio Poscic in the newest edition of The Wire, and not just because he has nice things to say about my contribution. More below:

Elizabeth Joan Kelly makes a flock of strings and percussion flicker like a failing simulation, while Apta, Moray Newlands and The Snaps Jar use the collapsing elation of synths and motivational messages to cut through the fabricated optimism and false sense of safety with unsettling satire. Despite its crowdsourced nature, You Can Never Leave is cohesive and succeeds where many highly conceptual works fail. It really makes you feel the misanthropic essence of capitalism.

You Can Never Leave is available on Bandcamp, and The Wire is available in print or online.

You Can Never Leave Review and Radio

You Can Never Leave, including my track “The Insufferable Shame Of The Pine Nut Bulk Bin,” was reviewed in A Closer Listen. An excerpt:

Some of the titles are particularly amusing:  “The Insufferable Shame of the Pine Nut Bulk Bin,” “Find Your Epic (A New Level of Hell,” “The Sauna Must Be Booked 24 Hours in Advance.”  Is this really heaven, or a scrubbed nightmare?  Precisely how happy is the upper class?  What would occur if a resident were to skip one of those cappuccinos? 

The compilation was also highlighted on Unofficial Britain, and Kate Bosworth played a few tracks on Dark Train.

Pre-order today and you get my track immediately. The full compilation is out on June 25. All proceeds go to Coffee4Craig, which provides vital support for Manchester’s homeless and people in crisis. You can watch my track accompanying the ad here.

C.M.S.O. Reviewed in The Wire

It’s with the utmost pride and joy that I share that Orca, Attack!’s C.M.S.O. is reviewed in this month’s edition of the incredible The Wire magazine. Spenser Tomson writes, “…incoherent snippets of detail are delivered via garbled new age electronics and blissed out chorals, like a sleep learning tape that’s been chewed by the deck.” The full review is available from Exact Editions or your local library. THANK YOU to Spenser and The Wire editorial staff for their support!

Podcasts and reviews!

Loads of new podcasts with Orca, Attack’s! C.M.S.O. on the deck this past couple of weeks:

And there’s an extremely perceptive track-by-track review of the album up on listencorp (we expect nothing less!). My favorite part:

Reaching an ecclesiastical euphoria of harmonies and echoes, the voice doles out thank you’s from the creators of the course. After which things descend into instrumental chaos with glissando notes filling the soundscape, ending the course on an emphatic and almost ornate note tied off with a twinkling swish of pixellated bells at the very end.

Finally, Farewell, Doomed Planet! is also back on the WTUL charts this week. By my count, that’s now 21 weeks? Amazing.

On The Fringes of Sound Review

Love this reaction to Orca, Attack’s! C.M.S.O. from On The Fringes of Sound:

When I received this one in my inbox, it immediately stood out to me as one of the most interesting concepts for an album. The entire EP is something of an essay being read aloud, except the message comes through… wrong.

I‘m currently four listens in and I‘m quite sure I haven’t learned anything. But I do know that it is also very fun to listen to.

Read the full review over on the website. Thanks Lars et al!

Dream of a review from Underscore

Well, this is the kind of review one dreams about. From Underscore Music Magazine’s new series, The Inbox:

“God, I love this. I love the music and I love the idea, which is one of those you wish you’d thought of yourself and can’t believe it hasn’t been done before…Airy vocals, mangled library music, robotic spoken word and sudden flights of electronic fancy guide the listener through what seems to be a pretty complex academic paper…”

More over on the Underscore website. Thank you!

Reviews and more!

Woke up this morning to quite a few happy notifications. First, Monolith Cocktail has a great write-up of C.M.S.O. This lovely excerpt should get you to want to read the whole thing:

A writer of repute on the failures of tech, communication and self-preservation, Rodriguez (who also files his musical experiments under Alison’s Disapproval) lends a constantly filtered and affected spoken word narration across all six tracks as Kelly swans, touches the ethereal with her diaphanous woos, calls, arias (a merger of Laurie Anderson, cosmic opera and Jane Weaver). Often transmogrified by robotic effects and the slowing and speeding up of that instructive monologue, Rodriguez’s message is constantly warped, broken up: sometimes on the verge of some Max Headroom glitch stutter, or the slurred falling apart speech of HAL.

*Achievement unlocked: Max Headroom comparison!

Max Headroom

We also seem to have successfully stumped Vital Weekly, who write of the album:

The music is mostly a computer treated voice/vocoder style, and along with some electronics playing some weird tune. The six pieces last altogether less than 19 minutes, which is perhaps the best thing for such a little curiosity. Great for confusion and confused to know what to say.

Vital Weekly also put out a podcast highlighting the music they’ve reviewed; be sure to check it out.

Finally, I haven’t been able to find a recording, but thank you to Kat O’Rly for playing “Literature Review” on WLUW’s Destination Unknown last night.

Avant Music News and Independent Music Podcast

Thank you to Mike for this amazing review of C.M.S.O. on Avant Music News. My favorite part:

The coupling of these topics with abstract modern classical and electronics is unique as far as I can tell. And this degree of quirky novelty is certainly in line with Kelly’s previous release. After a few listens, I am not sure what I learned but I do feel a little smarter.

And thank you as well to the legends at Independent Music Podcast for including “Abstract” on this week’s episode, which as always has resulted an influx of new additions to my Bandcamp wishlist.

Album release, Autumn Roses, and Truants Radio

Orca, Attack!’s C.M.S.O. is now out on Strategic Tape Reserve. There are only 3 cassettes left, and the digital album is also available on Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon, and wherever else you like to listen.

Autumn Roses spotlights the song “Conclusion” on their blog today, writing, “today their Orca, Attack! project released the surreal and psychedelic “listening guide” C​.​M​.S​.​O. (Learning by Listening Vol. 1). You can take an apricot-colored, helix-shaped trip with its “Conclusion” above.”

And Aidan Hanratty of Bandcloud hosted a Truants show on Refuge Worldwide that included “Limtations.”

Many thanks to all for the shares, comments, spotlights, and radio play!